Putnam County Road in Need of Expensive Repairs after Winter Weather

Putnam County Road In Need of Expensive Repairs after Winter Weather

A road in Cookeville, Tennessee, was so severely damaged by the long stretch of snow, ice, and freezing conditions in the state last winter that it now needs repairs that may most up to $700,000.

A report by the Herald-Citizen says that Mill Creek Road in Putnam County has suffered damage so extensive that it could require the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation to get involved to both rebuild the road while also protecting the surrounding wildlife.

Because the road so was heavily damaged, it posed a serious threat to drivers and is currently blocked off with traffic cones and yellow tape. Despite the urgent need for repairs, Putnam County officials say that the road department doesn’t have the money in its budget to fix the road and that it may have to apply for additional funding.

Matt Hardin Law’s team of Cookeville car accident attorneys hope that Putnam County is able to repair this road before it poses dangers to any drivers in the area.

What Causes Roads to Become Damaged and Dangerous?

Drivers expect the roads they travel on to be safe and free from dangers, but there are many circumstances that can cause roads to suffer significant damage that can increase the risk of car accidents. Some of the most common causes of road damage include:

  • Ice

Freezing temperatures and the subsequent formation of ice can cause major damage to roadways—especially if cities or towns are unprepared for the weather. When water gets inside small cracks or crevices in concrete or asphalt, it expands after freezing, which can cause small hairline cracks to become much larger. Eventually, the cracks can cause pieces of the road to begin breaking off entirely, leading to large and dangerous potholes or even entire sections of the roadway failing. When potholes become large enough, road crews must respond to them immediately in order to prevent serious accidents.

  • Falling rocks

Many interstates and roadways in Middle Tennessee are located near cliff sides and mountainous areas. While many of these roads are protected with guard rails, rock slides and boulders can occasionally break free from the surrounding areas and collide with the road below—often causing serious damage. When this happens, roads may become impassable for long periods of time as road crews work to clear the debris and rubble.

  • Fallen trees

In addition to ice damage, inclement weather can also cause trees to fall over, both damaging roads and making them impassable for drivers. Fallen trees on rural roads can be dangerous for drivers, but road crews throughout Middle Tennessee are trained to deal with these situations quickly in order to get traffic moving and prevent routes from being blocked for long periods of time.

  • Wear and tear from vehicles

Many streets, highways, and interstates throughout the mid-state area bear the brunt of thousands of vehicles every day. While roads are designed to hold up to even extreme conditions, the effect of non-stop traffic can eventually cause roads to break down and large pot holes to develop. That’s why road crews throughout the state work on a revolving schedule to repave old roads that are experienced the effects of years of damage caused by vehicles.

Although most drivers think of dangers in terms of other vehicles, sometimes the biggest danger they face is the road itself. If you notice a dangerous stretch of road, it’s important to contact your local road crews and alert them of the issue. The sooner they know about, the sooner they can fix it—and that can potentially save lives.

And if you were recently involved in a car accident caused by another party’s negligence, you may be eligible to receive compensation for your accident-related expenses. The Cookeville auto accident lawyers at Matt Hardin Law may be able to help you get money for things like medical bills, lost wages, and vehicle repair costs. To find out how, just dial (931) 754-1188 or fill out a free online form.

Contact Information