Cookeville Police and THP Taking Part in Booze It and Lose It Campaign

Cookeville Police and THP Taking Part in Booze It and Lose It Campaign

As part of the state’s Booze It and Lose It safety campaign, the Cookeville Police Department will team up with the Tennessee Governor’s Highway Safety Office to increase DUI enforcement through the Labor Day holiday.

A report by the Herald-Citizen says that last year, there were more than 6,600 alcohol-related crashes in the state of Tennessee, or an average of 18 accidents per day caused by people who decided to get behind the wheel after consuming alcohol.

The report goes on to state that in addition to the increased risk of being involved in a serious accident, a DUI conviction can also have serious financial consequences for offenders as well. It’s not uncommon for offenders to pay anywhere from $5,000 to $20,000 in fines, court costs, vehicle impounding fees, towing fees, and increased insurance premiums. In addition, many offenders are court-ordered to attend alcohol treatment.

To increase enforcement in Middle Tennessee, the THP will conduct a sobriety checkpoint on Friday, Sept. 11, on Highway 56 at Buffalo Valley Road from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Troopers will be on the lookout for drivers who appear to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

What Signs of Intoxication Do Police and State Troopers Look For?

Police and state troopers throughout Middle Tennessee are always on the lookout for drivers who are intoxicated or impaired. They are also trained to quickly spot and question drivers that appear to be exhibiting behavior that’s consistent with the signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol intoxication.

Some of the tell-tale signs that police and state troopers look for include:

  • Failure to maintain a lane

For sober drivers, maintaining a lane is easy and an expected part of driving. But for drivers who are impaired due to alcohol or drugs, maintaining a lane can become extremely difficult. Their vehicles may swerve erratically and occasionally cross over into adjacent lanes and even into oncoming traffic. Maintaining a lane requires steady vision and steady hands—both of which can be impaired by alcohol or drug use.

  • Turning with a wide radius

Sober drivers make turns that keep them well within their lanes. Impaired and intoxicated drivers are much more likely to make wide turns that may put their vehicle into the path of oncoming traffic or even stationary objects like parked vehicles, curbs, sidewalks, and even telephone poles.

  • Clipping or nearly striking nearby objects

Drivers who aren’t impaired are generally well aware of their vehicle’s position in relation to other objects. Drunk and intoxicated drivers often have difficulty determining how close or far away certain objects are, making them more likely to strike vehicles, street signs, trees, and other objects in their pathways. Police view drivers striking or nearly striking objects as a tell-tale sign of intoxication.

  • Driving too slowly or braking too soon

Driving while intoxicated doesn’t always mean that drivers take wild risks and display aggressive behavior. Many drivers overcompensate by driving well below the speed limit or slowing down long before they approach a stop sign, traffic light, or turn.

It goes without saying that driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is extremely dangerous not just for you and your passengers, but also for other drivers on the roadway as well. In addition to doing your part and never getting behind the wheel if you’re impaired, you can also help police by reporting any drivers you see who are displaying signs of intoxication noted in the list above.

Matt Hardin Law’s team of Cookeville car accident attorneys has no sympathy for drunk and impaired drivers, and we do everything in our power to help their victims get full compensation for their accident-related injuries. If you or someone you love was injured in an accident caused by an intoxicated driver, get in touch with our legal team today. Just dial (931) 754-1188 or fill out a free online form.

Contact Information